Canberra Mums Newsletter

Domestic Violence Crisis Service – Myth Busting (Part 2)

1. Domestic, family and intimate partner violence is physical only – FALSE

Domestic, family or intimate partner violence includes many elements. Some people might experience many elements and others might only experience one.

Some other elements include:

• Physical Violence: being hit, pushed or spat at;
• Verbal, Emotional and Psychological: being called names or being put down, threatening suicide or harm/damage;
• Sexual Abuse: unwanted sexual advances, forced sex, filming/photographing someone without their consent;
• Isolation: hindering contact with family and/or friends;
• Property Damage: punching walls, breaking furniture;
• Financial: hindering employment, not disclosing the financial position of the family;
• Pets: Harm towards or threatening harm towards pets;
• Spiritual: Forcing or restricting someone from practising their chosen religion;
• Outing, or threats to out, someone: In particular for members of the LGBTIQA+ community;
• Medication & Equipment: Restricting access to medication, medical equipment or medical assistance, in particular for people who experience a disability;
• Tech Abuse: Receiving threats or being stalked via social media, online or phones and computers, and the use of tracking devices.

2. Only people on Government benefits or from other Countries experience domestic, family or intimate partner violence – FALSE

Anyone can experience domestic, family or intimate partner violence, the issue does not discriminate. People from all cultures, races, religions and of all ages and genders experience domestic, family and intimate partner violence.

3. Men experience just as much domestic, family or intimate partner violence as women – FALSE

While men do experience domestic, family and intimate partner violence, the overwhelming majority of those who do experience it are women and children.

There is a claim floating around that one in three men experience domestic, family or intimate partner violence. This is false and has been proven to be false on multiple occasions.

4. People experiencing domestic, family or intimate partner violence can just leave – FALSE

Sometimes people who experience domestic, family or intimate partner violence don’t know they are. Often the most dangerous time for a person is once they have made the decision to leave the relationship.

There are many things that might stop someone from leaving including fear, lack of financial resources, concerns about breaking up the family, lack of supports or isolation.

5. Alcohol and drug use is the cause of all domestic, family and intimate partner violence – FALSE

Certainly the use of alcohol or illicit drugs can cause the incidents of violence to be more serve, but the use is not the sole cause of domestic, family or intimate partner violence.

For more information on how DVCS can support you or a friend, please call their 24/7 crisis line on 6280 0900 or visit www.dvcs.org.au

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